Tuesday, July 17
DIY

Feed: Geyser needs heat to fight bacteria

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In response about painting shower floors, Lindy writes:

In response about painting shower floors, Lindy writes:
You are right that tiles should be removed and marine paint used.
The non-slip stuff they use on boat decks. Expensive but worth it. 
Bob, of course, has an answer for Gillian’s shower problem in
Betty’s Bay. 
Gillian’s shower problems would best be solved if she abandoned
further costly repairs and fitted a complete fibre-glass/plastic (all in
one) moulded corner shower cubicle. I fitted one in my wood cabin
(dry-walled) holiday home. It’s attractive and can never leak. 
Whenever I return from overseas I wonder why we don’t do this
more in this country. I guess it’s because we still tend to use bricks
or blocks for most of our building.
Last week’s column on burst geysers brought a flood of comments
and confirmed we are bad at reading instructions and looking
after equipment. 
I was worried to catch something on Cape Talk
the other afternoon, when they were discussing the occurrence of
bacteria causing Legionnaires’ disease in hot water cylinders, so my
advice to turn your geyser down may not have been a good idea. 
Brannon comments:
I set my geyser at 60°C. Anything below 55°C will promote
rapid bacteria growth in the geyser. You may save water by
showering with a friend, but certainly not with bacteria.
Geysers are fitted with an anode to minimise corrosion resulting
in “bursts”. 
They need to be checked annually and replaced when
necessary. Should you not do this an insurance claim may be
repudiated.
Edgar agrees on the anode:
You omitted to mention that modern cylinders, especially cheaper
high-pressure ones with vitreous enamelled steel tanks, have a
sacrificial anode made of zinc on the inside that sits in the water,
and has to be replaced periodically. It does its job by being used
up instead of the vitreous enamelled steel, which has pinhole spots
in the coating, which corrodes if the sacrificial anode is left to be
eaten.


Handy Mac, aka Don MacAlister, is our expert on household DIY issues. If you have a question for him, please send it to don@macalister.co.za or SMS only to 082 446 3859. Find Don on FB: facebook.com/thehandymac
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